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01 Jun

RFID More And More Key For Transport Companies

Posted in Recommended Software on 01.06.15

Radio-frequency tags have become a must for the nation’s rail operations. Now, motor carriers are discovering plenty of uses for tags both on the road and in the yard.

rfA few years ago, radio-frequency (RF) tags or transponders were used only in the rail industry and then, only as a means of tracking rail-cars. Today, however, tags have begun to catch on in the trucking industry, where private fleets and for-hire carriers alike are testing tags to speed up highway inspections and customs clearance and to identify equipment and loads.

Although only a few companies are experimenting with these devices right now, many industry experts believe tags will soon see widespread use. In the near future, they predict, tags will become as commonplace as bar codes when it comes to automatic-identification equipment used in distribution. “This technology is going to [revolutionize] the way some people manage their fleets,” predicts Jim Mathis, a vice president of engineering at trucking software maker Industrial Computer Systems in Evergreen, Colo.

Tale of the Tag

What is an RF tag? Basically, the tag consists of an antenna and microcircuit for data storage. The antenna can transmit the stored information – such as a trailer ID – via radio waves to a reader. Because radio waves are used, a tag reader does not require a direct line of sight to capture and decode information stored on the device.

The tags themselves come in two basic types – passive or active. Passive tags rely on energy from the reader to initiate communication. Active tags, on the other hand, use internal power to send signals to the reader.

Until recently, RF tags could only transmit data to a reader over a short range – often no more than 10 feet. Newer tags have ranges up to 300 feet. Similarly, whereas earlier versions

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06 May

Some Great Tools To Manage Your Site With

Posted in Recommended Software on 06.05.15

sgtmysIf your site uses any JPEG graphics files, you should consider CyberView Image Pro 4.02. This handy utility lets you visually adjust the JPEG compression for your graphics files. Side-by-side examples of both the compressed and noncompressed image help you decide how much compression is acceptable. Too much compression brings the file size down but can blur the image. Too little compression keeps the image looking good, but may not reduce the file size enough for expeditious Web viewing.

This kind of side-by-side image comparison is available in some commercial image-editing programs, such as Adobe Systems‘ ImageReady and Ulead Systems’ PhotoImpact 4. However, CyberView Image Pro goes further than these programs by providing a more refined toolset. It has three sets of sliders, each with a separate adjustment for the luma (intensity) and chroma (color) components. The three sliders are Precision (which determines the accuracy of the compression process), Compression (which determines how much of the original image information is removed during the compression process), and Selective (which determines the compression values for a selected area of the image). A fourth slider, Smoothing, adjusts how much optimal noise is removed.

For those who want to delve even deeper into the intricacies of the program’s JPEG compression, CyberView Image Pro lets you

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27 Apr

Need Power – Get Fusion!

Posted in Recommended Software on 27.04.15

npgfWhen Fusion first arrived on the scene, NetObjects promised designers the kind of control over their Web sites that they had over print pages, but the company couldn’t deliver. Although version 2.0 made great strides, it’s only with version 3.0 that NetObjects has delivered a versatile Web development tool. Now sporting flexible page and site editors and strong support of Dynamic HTML features, Fusion has come of age.

Ahead of Its Time

Fusion’s pasteboard has always been one of the program’s killer features. With a pasteboard-layout metaphor, you create complex Web pages simply by dragging and dropping text and images on a page. Fusion generates the HTML code when you’re ready to put your page on the Web.

Previous versions of Fusion use complicated grids to replicate a user’s designs within the limitations of HTML. You can now also choose to use Layers, a new feature supported in version 4.0 and later browsers, to draw pages without the hidden complexity of grids. (The older, table-based system remains if you need compatibility with older browsers.) Fusion

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